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What Is FDCPA – Law To Defend Yourself From Debt Collection Letters…

Class Action Lawsuit Investigation For Debt Collection Letters 

Have you received a debt or bill collector’s collection letter? If this is the case, you may be entitled to compensation, considering that your privacy rights have been violated. 

Dealing with debt and bill collectors can be frustrating. The good thing is there’s a federal law in place to protect you from abusive debt collectors.

The FDCPA

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) was passed in 1977 to protect consumers against abusive debt collection practices and safeguard their privacy. 

The FDCPA goal is to shield consumers from certain kinds of unreasonable debt collection practices, such as interacting with third parties about debts.

It has been found that consumers receive letters from debt and bill collectors demanding payment. However, these companies do not always print and deliver the letters themselves.

Instead, they sometimes give away private information about consumers’ debts to other businesses, who will then assemble letters for mailing. This means that private, confidential information — information that certain people might find sensitive or humiliating, is shared with people who should not have access to it in the first place.

The FDCPA was introduced to prohibit companies from invading people’s privacy and participating in unfair data collection practices. 

Moreover, consumers who have had their rights violated under the FDCPA may be entitled to claim up to $1,000 in damages, even though they have suffered no out-of-pocket losses.

Type of Collection Letters Governed By The FDCPA

The FDCPA only applies to debt collectors, not to existing creditors.

To sum up, the letter should be from a debt or bill collector that you’re in debt to. In addition, the FDCPA’s statute of limitations is one year from the date of the conviction.

Documenting Evidence for FDCPA Violations

If you’re thinking about filing an FDCPA class action lawsuit, follow these measures to defend your rights:

  • All the letters from debt collectors or bill collectors should be kept.
  • All voice and text messages should be saved.
  • Keep a written record of the emails, phone calls, and text messages you receive.

Enforcing the FDCPA 

Individuals can implement the FDCPA in a variety of ways:

  • If a company breaches the FDCPA, individuals may sue for damages in court.
  • The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) provides statutory penalties of up to $1,000, plus any potential damages.
  • Class actions may be filed. A debt collector can be held liable to a class of people approved by a court for statutory damages of up to 1% of its net worth or $500,000, whichever is less, in a successful class action.

Editor’s Note on What Is FDCPA – Law To Defend Yourself From Debt Collection Letters:

This article is published to inform you of the latest class action lawsuit investigation for debt collection letters. It has been found that consumers receive letters from debt and bill collectors demanding payment. However, these companies do not always print and deliver the letters themselves, violating consumers’ privacy.

Have you received any debt collection letters in the past year? Do you feel like your privacy has been violated? If so, do not hesitate to join or file an FDCPA class action lawsuit. Or you can message us by clicking the ‘Contact Us’ button below. We would love to hear from you. 

Contact Us

You can also reach out to us on Twitter or Facebook or via email at Outreach@ConsiderTheConsumer.com. Also, directly on our website! We look forward to hearing from you.

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