Report Fraud About Us What We Do

Hyundai Kona & Ioniq Battery Class Action Lawsuit 2021 - Selling Defective Electric Batteries That Short Circuit - Siamak Kermani

Consumer Class Actions

Hyundai Kona & Ioniq Battery Class Action Lawsuit 2021 – Selling Defective Electric Batteries That Short Circuit…

Hyundai Class Action Lawsuit for Alleged Defective Battery System

A new class action lawsuit argues that a dangerous battery system in Hyundai’s Kona & Inoiq electric vehicles puts the passenger/s at risk of catching fire when charging, parking, or driving.

Siamak Kermani v. Hyundai Motor America, et al.

The Hyundai Kona & Ioniq Battery Class Action Lawsuit 2021 was filed in California on June 28 by lead plaintiff Siamak Kermani. He alleges that Hyundai Motor America was aware of the defect caused by an electrical short circuit inside the battery cell but did nothing to address it. Kermani continues that the company informed customers that there was no repair.

The battery defect affected the following Hyundai cars:

  • 2019-2020 Hyundai Kona Electric Cars
  • 2020 Hyundai Ioniq Electric Cars

According to the lawsuit, owners of electric vehicles were provided with software “updates” that did not address the defect. Instead, it instructed to have the battery’s state of charge limit reduced to 80% to mitigate fire risk. In addition, the update also advised avoiding parking the vehicle indoors without lowering the charge limit.

Hyundai was aware of the battery issue, its pervasiveness, and the lack of a proper fix for a significant period prior to the initial recall on October 13, 2020, the class action lawsuit states. According to Kermani, Hyundai continued selling and leasing the compromised vehicles to the general public despite the issue.

Catching Fire

The attorney representing Kermani stated that Hyundai was the second automaker in less than a year to sell electric vehicles to California customers with defective battery systems that can catch fire. 

In March 2021, Hyundai stated that the primary cause was short circuits in the battery cells, which resulted in at least 15 fires in Kona Electric vehicles. On the other hand, the automaker added that no fires had been reported in the United States.

Hyundai stated that the alleged defective batteries were from LG Energy Solutions China (Nanjing) plant.

According to the Hyundai Kona & Ioniq Battery Class Action Lawsuit 2021, Hyundai is required to refund 2019-2020 Kona Electric and 2020 Ioniq Electric owners and lessees in California under California’s Lemon Law.

Hyundai is not the only automaker facing legal action over battery-related issues with electric vehicles. Mercedes-Benz was recently charged in a class action lawsuit alleging that a $77,000 Mercedes-Benz GLE 450 SUV fails to start and has other issues as a result of the electrical system and 48-volt battery defects.

Editor’s Note on Hyundai Kona & Ioniq Battery Class Action Lawsuit 2021:

This is written to inform you of Hyundai’s 2019-2020 Hyundai Kona Electric and 2020 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicles that allegedly have defective battery systems.

Case Name & No.: Siamak Kermani v. Hyundai Motor America, et al.Siamak Kermani, v. Hyundai Motor America, et al.

Jurisdiction: Superior Court of the State of California, County of Los Angeles

Products/Services:  2019-2020 Hyundai Kona Electric and 2020 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicles

Allegations: Hyundai Kona and Ioniq alleged defective battery system that can catch fire

Status: Pending

Contact Us

You can also reach out to us on Twitter or Facebook or via email at Outreach@ConsiderTheConsumer.com. Also, directly on our website! We look forward to hearing from you.

Suggested Article: Ford F Super F-350 Duty Fake Loading Capacity Class Action.

Interested in posts like these? Stay up to date with our newsletter!

No thoughts on “Hyundai Kona & Ioniq Battery Class Action Lawsuit 2021 – Selling Defective Electric Batteries That Short Circuit…” yet. Be the first to speak your mind!

Leave a Reply