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Credit and Debit Card Receipt Privacy Class Action Lawsuit Investigation Consider The Consumer

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Credit and Debit Card Receipt Privacy Class Action Lawsuit Investigation

Credit Card Information According to the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA)

The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) states that vendors can print no more than the last five digits of a credit or debit card number on a receipt and cannot disclose any portion of the card’s expiration date.

Retailers and vendors displaying more than this on credit card receipts may be liable for violations of FACTA. Consumers can claim between $100 and $1000, while lead plaintiffs can collect incentive awards as much as $20,000.

Are you affected by the Credit and Debit Card Receipt Privacy allegations? Send us a message today to see if you are entitled to join the lawsuit investigation.

More on the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA)

Congress passed the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) into law in 2003 to protect consumers from risks of identity theft.

The problem with not having the right standardized amount of card information is that criminals can gather the information of the same card from multiple receipts out of different retailers and vendors to piece them together and complete the card number, expiration date, and account numbers. This can also be used by identity thieves or phishing attackers through data readily available on the “dark web.”

FACTA regulations state that “no person that accepts credit cards or debit cards for the transaction of business shall print more than the last 5 digits of the card number or the expiration date upon any receipt provided to the cardholder at the point of the sale or transaction.”

This includes any electronically printed receipt produced by cash registers, self-service kiosks, and restaurants, and can even include those in the form of a contract or an invoice.

This does not apply, however, to receipts that are emailed, handwritten, imprinted, or included inside a package shipped to your home.

Sensitive or private card information must be censored through truncation by hiding numbers with symbols such as * or #.

Failure to comply with the rules set out in FACTA renders the retailer or vendor liable and may be sued.

Editor’s note on the Credit and Debit Card Receipt Privacy Class Action Lawsuit Investigation:

This piece is written about the Credit and Debit Card Receipt Privacy Lawsuit Investigation. If you are considered eligible to be among the class of consumers described in the class action lawsuit investigation, you may eventually be able to participate in receiving any compensation the court may award.

If you believe that what is alleged in the Credit and Debit Card Receipt Privacy Class Action Lawsuit Investigation has affected you, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us.

Contact Us

We’d be happy to help you take a step in the right direction, fight this issue, and better enable you to join the consumer class action. If interested, please send an email to Outreach@ConsiderTheConsumer.com, find us on Twitter or Facebook, or even connect with us directly on our website! We look forward to hearing from you all.

Similarly, please check out our current list of Class Actions and Class Action Investigations, here.

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